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01.01.2015 Marine : Air pollution emissions controls

Ships trading in designated emission control areas will have to use on board fuel oil with a sulphur content of no more than 0.10% from 1 January 2015, against the limit of 1.00% in effect up until 31 December 2014.
Ships trading in designated emission control areas will have to use on board fuel oil with a sulphur content of no more than 0.10% from 1 January 2015, against the limit of 1.00% in effect up until 31 December 2014.

The stricter rules come into effect under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution form ships (MARPOL) Annex VI (Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships), specifically under regulation 14, which covers emissions of Sulphur Oxides (SOx) and particulate matter from ships. These requirements were adopted in October 2008 by consensus and entered into force in July 2010.

The emission control areas established under MARPOL Annex VI for SOx are: the Baltic Sea area; the North Sea area; the North American area (covering designated coastal areas off the United States and Canada); and the United States Caribbean Sea area (around Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands).

Outside the emission control areas, the current limit for sulphur content of fuel oil is 3.50%, falling to 0.50% m/m on and after 1 January 2020. The 2020 date is subject to a review, to be completed by 2018, as to the availability of the required fuel oil. Depending on the outcome of the review, this date could be deferred to 1 January 2025.

Ships may also meet the SOx requirements by using gas as a fuel or an approved equivalent method, for example, exhaust gas cleaning systems or “scrubbers”.

02.02.2015 Marine : Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) & Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for Yachts

EEDI

The EEDI aims to promote the use of more energy efficient (less polluting) equipment and engines.

The EEDI is a non-prescriptive, performance-based mechanism that leaves the choice of technologies to use in a specific yacht design to the industry. As long as the required energy efficiency level is attained, yacht designers and builders are free to use the most cost-efficient solutions for the vessel to comply with the regulations. The EEDI provides a specific figure for an individual yacht design, expressed in grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per yacht’s capacity-mile (the smaller the EEDI the more energy efficient ship design) and is calculated by a formula based on the technical design parameters.

SEEMP

The SEEMP is intended to be a management tool to assist a yacht in managing the ongoing environmental performance of its operations. It is recommended that a yacht or its management company develop procedures for implementing the plan in a manner, which limits the onboard administrative burden to a minimum.

The SEEMP seeks to improve a yacht’s energy efficiency through four steps: planning, implementation, monitoring, and self-evaluation and improvement. These components play a critical role in the continuous cycle to improve energy management. Achieving these goals can be done through a combination of structural and operations actions. These may include improved voyage planning, weather routing, optimized speed, consistent shaft power, enhanced use of rudder and heading control systems (autopilots), and hull maintenance.

15.12.14 Faberled goes for ISO9001

Thanks to Hawkstone Consultants for your useful information in the implementation of ISO9001. Faberled are looking to achieve ISO9001